Lighting Questions and Answers

Lighting designer, tips, ideas by Jim Hoyle
Subject: Foyer lighting

Question: I have a hallway 5 1/2 ft wide x 14 feet long, with 10 ft ceiling, 2 sets of double doors and a single door leading into different rooms. Would a bowl pendant 28" wide x 34" high be a good size for this hallway or would it be too big? thanks

Answer: This fixture is out of proportion to this area. Look for something around 18" wide and 30" high maximum.

The most important constraint is the 5.5' width. Then be sure to allow plenty of clearance underneath, at least 7.5'.
A good exercise is to simply draw a rectangle 5.5" x 14" which represents the floor space. Then draw a circle in the center 1.5" to represent an 18" wide fixture. This will provide you with a quick reference for the relative sizes involved.
You can then repeat this exercise by substituting the size of any chandelier that you are considering. Just convert inches to feet to make your drawing.
I hope these ideas prove helpful to you.
Good luck with your project.

Subject: pendants on vaulted ceiling over vanity

Question: I have a 10 by twelve bathroom remodel underway. It is very traditional, however, I want to stay away from typical over the mirror bath light strips. The vanity is 72 inches and the 2 mirrors over the sinks are 21 inches wide with a 21 inch space between them. a substantial crown moldings on the top of the mirror is detracted from by a typical vanity light. I have read that side lighting is best and thought about sconce on the wall between the mirrors to prevent shadows and two pendent above. There is only 4 1/2 inches between the left mirror and a wall so a sconce is out and my only option for side lighting is a grossly over priced rather contemporary florescent tube light. The electrician and G think 2 pendent and a sconce will look stupid. Can I have fashion and function. Will I have good enough light for makeup application with just two pendants or do I need a third? How far from the rear wall do I mount them? They will be different lengths because of the vault so do they need to be custom or are they adjustable? Is an cinch chandelier over a 52" x 7.0' tub deck over kill or elegant. Every G I interviewed pushed recessed light like they were the only option so i feel like I have to have them. They seem appropriate over the commode (which has a half wall) and the shower which is a clear glass enclosure off the end of the tub. Would a skylight above the open space between the tub and vanity affect the chandelier decision? The electrician is coming and I am so confused. I usually trust my eye but in this case.....HELP!

Answer: Pendant lights are a great choice for this application but be sure you consider only those with standard Edison base sockets with a minimum wattage rating of at least 100 watts. A fixture rated at only 60 watts will likely be inadequate for this use.

There are a many pendants on the market and many of them require specialty bi pin or halogen bulbs which are not recommended. Additionally, standard sockets allow you to use the economical compact fluorescent CFL bulbs which will save a great deal on the amount of heat discharged as well as the amount of energy used. Avoid deeply or richly colored glass shades as these will absorb a great deal of light and are not as efficient. White, frosted glass, scavo glass, beige glass and off white glass provide the most light output.

I am not able to comment on the likely hood of shadows in general without a detailed diagram of the room which is not appropriate for this venue. However, a 100 watt pendant mounted directly over a vanity should provide adequate lighting for the vanity area without any shadow in the vanity area. Hanging the the pendant fixture so that the bottom of the glass is around 7.5 feet off the floor is usually appropriate for a vanity application. Select one with a wider shade that will spread the light out more evenly.

Now I will address your additional questions:

Will I have good enough light for makeup application with just two pendants or do I need a third? Answer: Two (2) pendants with the specifications listed above should be more than adequate for your situation.

How far from the rear wall do I mount them? Answer: The center of the pendant should be positioned approximately over the center of the sink. Be sure to check the width of the pendant glass to make sure it will clear the back wall.

They will be different lengths because of the vault so do they need to be custom or are they adjustable? Answer: This feature varies with the manufacturer but most pendants can be hung a varying heights. Check with the lighting showroom where you purchase the pendants to make certain of these details.

Is an cinch chandelier over a 52" x 7.0' tub deck over kill or elegant. Answer: I am not familiar with the term "CINCH" but a properly sized chandelier may be striking in this situation. Think in terms of relativity.

Every G I interviewed pushed recessed light like they were the only option so i feel like I have to have them. They seem appropriate over the commode (which has a half wall) and the shower which is a clear glass enclosure off the end of the tub. Would a skylight above the open space between the tub and vanity affect the chandelier decision? The electrician is coming and I am so confused. I usually trust my eye but in this case.....HELP! Answer: Chandeliers in close proximity to skylights usually do not work very well. Recessed lighting in general has numerous drawbacks and inefficiencies but a single recess light in this application would likely work fine. A good option for this area may be a semi flush mount fixture, a flush mount fixture or even a petite chandelier.

I hope these ideas prove useful to you and your family and that your project is a great success.

-------- Subject: lighting

Question: I am working on a project that has a salt water pool. Is one type of lighting better than another for the pool room and ajoining rooms considering the type of light as well as the material the fixtures are made of?
Thanks, Denise

Answer: I apologize for not being able to provide a more detailed answer but this situation requires very special consideration.

If the fixtures are exposed to the outdoors, then they will likely require an outdoor "RATING" by the manufacturer. Many outdoor fixtures are made of aluminum and polyresin so they will endure the elements of exposure. If your fixtures are exposed to a salt water atmosphere even in an enclosed area it may be advisable to consider outdoor type fixtures. This situation requires that a lighting professional either review your specific blueprints or perhaps make a personal visit to your location.

-------- Subject: Lighting finishes and kitchen finishes

Question: My question is similar to one already posted, but, I want an answer based on my specific situation.  I am installing a new kitchen and have picked out cream-colored cabinets that are distressed and glazed.  The cabinet hardware and kitchen faucet are oil-rubbed bronze.  The appliances are stainless steel (with some black in certain places).  I will have some recessed lighting in the kitchen as well as pendant lights over an island, a light over the dining table and a light over the kitchen sink.  I am struggling with whether the lights should be oil-rubbed bronze or satin nickel as in the rest of my house.  The kitchen lights will be far removed from any of the existing satin nickel finish lights, which exist in the bathrooms and hall.

Answer: Since your kitchen already uses the two colors oil rub bronze (ORB) and stainless steel (essentially nickel), you can certainly continue this theme. I see no conflict in using either of these color finishes in your lighting fixtures for the kitchen.

However, keep in mind that ORB is a warm and cozy color and nickel is a cooler color. If you want your kitchen to appear warmer, cozy and more inviting, you might consider using ORB. If you want a cool urban look, you might consider using nickel instead.

Ultimately, it really is a matter of preference.

I hope these ideas prove helpful in your lighting decision and that your kitchen is a beautiful place for you and your family to gather and eat.
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Subject: Lamp shades
Question: I have an old 50-60's style metal table lamp that I am renovating. It has three metal lamp shades connected to a single metal base. I removed all the paint from the lamp shades to keep the stainless steel look. Is there a coating to protect the lamp shades from rusting? Will they rust if left untreated? Thank you.
Answer: Yes, if the leaves are made of steel or iron, they will definitely rust and probably sooner than later.

First, make sure all the existing rust and oxidation is removed then carefully clean the metal by using gloves and without touching it again with your hands. This step is very important because the oil from your hands will immediately begin oxidation anew even though you may not be able to see it for days or even weeks.

There are numerous sealers that are good for preventing rust and one of the best is polyurethane. After a thorough cleaning, you can then seal the metal with a light coating of polyurethane which is available in a convenient spray can at most hardware as well as many other stores. It is available in a matte, satin or gloss sheen. Apply 2-3 light coats and follow the directions on the spray can. This is a very durable and hard finish and will likely last as long as anything available.

Your project sounds very interesting and I wish that I could see your lamps from this bygone era.

Good luck with your project !

Consider using compact fluorescent light bulbs if possible. They not only save you a lot of money, they emit much less heat and last much longer than regular incandescent bulbs.

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Subject: How high should be my sofa end table lamps?
QUESTION: Hi,
I want to decorate my living room with the lamps that i want to place over both the end table placed along each arm of my sofa but wondering about the lamp's height ..i just don't understand if i should buy tall lamps that is between 27"to 30" assembled height or dwarf lamps..which one will look elgent tall or dwarf or any could work? my sofa back is 27" up from floor arms are 17" up from floor and end table height is 18"..please advice
thanks

ANSWER: That is an excellent question and I believe some general discussion should help you answer the question.

First, think in relative terms. Before deciding on the height and the overall mass or girth of the table lamps to use, ask yourself a few other questions. What is the general overall size of the room and of the sofa. Further, are your ceilings 8' tall or are they very high cathedral type ceilings. Big rooms, big furniture and tall ceilings cry out for lamps that are at least 31" tall and very likely taller. If you have a moderate size room, moderate size furniture and average ceilings of 8-9 feet high, then you are definitely looking for a moderate size lamp that is roughly around 26-31" tall. I would not recommend lamps smaller than 26" tall unless the room and the furniture is small or petite in size.

Another issue to keep in mind is the amount of light needed for your room. Each portable lamp is rated by the manufacturer as to the maximum light bulb wattage that can be used in the lamp. Generally speaking, smaller lamps will have smaller shades and they are likely to require smaller wattage bulbs. Conversely, larger lamps will have larger shades and are likely to allow for larger wattage light bulbs. Be certain to carefully read and follow the manufacturer's label which specifies the maximum wattage light bulb for each lamp.

Another issue is the table size. Small lamps may seem lost on large tables and vice versa.

No matter which size lamp you select, be sure to consider using the Energy Star compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs. These bulbs not only save you a lot of money on energy use, they emit much less heat than a regular incandescent bulb and their life span is much longer.

I hope these ideas prove helpful to you in deciding on the proper size table lamps to use beside your living room sofa.

Good luck with your project !

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: thank you so much for your explanatory reply....i am attaching the pic of the room ..pls take a look and let me know how long in inches can probably be the height of my lamps


Answer: Thank you for your photo which answers many questions. Moderate size lamps around 27" tall should be perfect for this arrangement.

Select lamps of small to moderate width as a large body will over power the end tables. Candlestick or buffet style lamps would also be right at home in this setting. These lamps are relatively tall and slender with smaller shades. However, most candlestick or buffet style lamps will normally require smaller light bulb wattage. If this is an issue then select a slightly larger body lamp around 3-4" in width that has a shade which measures around 11" - 12" along the side/slant.

Since your colors are neutral, you can use brass, black, brown, rust, bronze, gold, ivory, white, or you can liven and brighten it up with a lamp that has some subtle splash of colors.

So with some latitude, 27" tall lamps (overall) that have bodies around 3" wide with 11-12" shades (measured on the side) would be a perfect selection for your room.

Be sure to consider using the very efficient and economical CFL bulbs (compact fluorescent). These will save you money with lower heat output.

After seeing the photo of your room, I would be most interested in seeing the results of your lamp choice.

Good luck on your project.

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Subject: How hight should be my sofa end table lamps?
Question: Hi,
I want to decorate my living room with the lamps that i want to place over both the end table placed along each arm of my sofa but wondering about the lamp's height ..i just don't understand if i should buy tall lamps that is between 27"to 30" assembled height or dwarf lamps..which one will look elgent tall or dwarf or any could work? my sofa back is 27" up from floor arms are 17" up from floor and end table height is 18"..please advice
thanks


Answer: That is an excellent question and I believe some general discussion should help you answer the question.

First, think in relative terms. Before deciding on the height and the overall mass or girth of the table lamps to use, ask yourself a few other questions. What is the general overall size of the room and of the sofa. Further, are your ceilings 8' tall or are they very high cathedral type ceilings. Big rooms, big furniture and tall ceilings cry out for lamps that are at least 31" tall and very likely taller. If you have a moderate size room, moderate size furniture and average ceilings of 8-9 feet high, then you are definitely looking for a moderate size lamp that is roughly around 26-31" tall. I would not recommend lamps smaller than 26" tall unless the room and the furniture is small or petite in size.

Another issue to keep in mind is the amount of light needed for your room. Each portable lamp is rated by the manufacturer as to the maximum light bulb wattage that can be used in the lamp. Generally speaking, smaller lamps will have smaller shades and they are likely to require smaller wattage bulbs. Conversely, larger lamps will have larger shades and are likely to allow for larger wattage light bulbs. Be certain to carefully read and follow the manufacturer's label which specifies the maximum wattage light bulb for each lamp.

Another issue is the table size. Small lamps may seem lost on large tables and vice versa.

No matter which size lamp you select, be sure to consider using the Energy Star compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs. These bulbs not only save you a lot of money on energy use, they emit much less heat than a regular incandescent bulb and their life span is much longer.

I hope these ideas prove helpful to you in deciding on the proper size table lamps to use beside your living room sofa.

Good luck with your project !

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Subject: floor lamp that turns on with wall switch?
Question: I've recently moved to a new house, and was told that one of our mains plugs is a special one to put a special kind of floor lamp in, and there is a light switch on the wall that controls this plug. This plug has two holes for a two-pronged plug to go in it.

I would like to buy a floor lamp to plug into this plug, but have no idea what this type of lamp is called!! Does it have a special name? Where can I find a lamp of this kind? I'm completely lost!!

Thanks so much for your help!!

Answer: I may be lost as well as I have never heard of a special floor lamp that works in conjunction with a special wall switch.

Normally, most electrical outlets (where you plug in a lamp or other electrical appliance) in a house are wired so they are "HOT" or "ON" all the time. However, it is common to have one or more electrical outlets that are controlled by a wall switch. This type of outlet is useful especially when entering a dark room so you do not have to walk across the dark room to turn the lamp on. It is necessary to keep the on/off switch of the lamp in the "ON" position and operate the lamp from the wall switch. Any type of table or floor lamp works in this type of electrical outlet that is controlled by a wall switch. It does not require any special features. The electrical wiring in the house of course must be wired in this special way so that the wall switch will turn the outlet on/off.

I hope these ideas are useful and that you enjoy the convenience of your wall switch/electrical outlet combination.

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Subject: Unique Lamps
Question:

Lamp
Hello,
I have recently acquired this set of brass and marble lamps. I have done some research via the Internet and I have not been able to find anything exactly like them. I do believe that they are considered "Hollywood Regency Style". Can you tell me anything about them or point me in the right direction so I can find out how old they are, what they might be worth, etc. On the bottom of each lamp the word "CORNELL" is stamped and each lamps has a set of numbers, 1136 on one and 1138 on the other. Any information would be helpful.

Thank you,

Tammy


Answer: This subject falls under our separate category of lamp appraisals and is not appropriate for this particular venue which is dedicated to Lighting Design questions.

I will be happy to help you if you wish to contact me personally through my website below.

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Subject: Pendant Lighting Above Bathroom Sink
Question: Hi Jim,

I am remodeling my guest bathroom. The ceiling in the bath is 12 ft high.
There is a window on the same wall as the vanity. The bottom of the window
is 90 inches from the bottom of the floor. The width of this wall is 72" and I
am having a two bowl vanity installed. The vanity is against an exterior
'block' wall. I would like to hand pendant lights, one above each sink, from a
ceiling mounted monorail system. Would pendant lights provide enough
light? Would I have shadows? Thanks, Jim!

Answer: Pendant lights are a great choice for this application but be sure you consider only those with standard Edison base sockets with a minimum wattage rating of at least 100 watts. A fixture rated at only 60 watts will likely be inadequate for this use.

There are a wide variety of pendants on the market and many of them require specialty bi pin or halogen bulbs which are not recommended. Additionally, standard sockets allow you to use the economical compact fluorescent CFL bulbs which will save a great deal on the amount of heat discharged as well as the amount of energy used. Avoid deeply or richly colored glass shades as these will absorb a great deal of light and are not as efficient. White, frosted glass, scavo glass, beige glass and off white glass provide the most light output.

I am not able to comment on the likely hood of shadows in general without a detailed diagram of the room which is not appropriate for this venue. However, a 100 watt pendant mounted directly over a vanity should provide adequate lighting for the vanity area without any shadow in the vanity area. Hanging the the pendant fixture so that the bottom of the glass is around 7.5 feet off the floor is usually appropriate for a vanity application. Select one with a wider shade that will spread the light out more evenly.

I hope these ideas prove useful to you and your family and that your remodeling project is a great success.

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Subject: table lamp
Question: table lamp
hi Jim ,i was just wondering about my lamp and the story behind it and and approx.value. it has carved written name on back G. mascagny ,on my own judging from kinda the same lamps that i found on the net.it about 1920 and from italy,but thats just a guess could never find one just like it though.thank you for any info i really appriciate that you help people .thanks Will


Answer: This subject falls under our separate category of lamp appraisals which is not appropriate for this particular venue which is dedicated to Lighting Design questions.

I will be happy to help you if you wish to contact me personally through my website below.

Subject: 1950 motion lamp
Question: I recently purchased one of these lamps, The Fountain of Youth, it appears to be in very good condition. My question is what type or wattage bulbs am I to use with this lamp? I have tried a 25 & 40 watt clear bulb but the lamp's inside shade still will not turn. Any suggestions are appreciated! Thank you!

Answer: The correct wattage to use is a critical question with all lamps and lighting and especially so with this vintage motion lamp.

I am familiar with the very cute Fountain of Youth Motion Lamps and I also personally own a comparable Niagara Falls Motion Lamp so I can appreciate the question that you are posing.

There are several concerns that must be taken into account:
1) Safety regarding heat from the light bulb and the potential for fire
2) Proper bulb wattage and shape creating enough heat to rotate the fan/cylinder but not so much as to damage the lamp components
3) Proper mechanical set up for smooth operation of the rotating fan/cylinder

To determine the proper bulb to use, this lamp must be inspected and serviced by an experienced professional. This is not the kind of job that I would recommend for anyone to undertake due to the numerous safety issues plus the potential to permanently damage your antique lamp.

I regret that my answer may not be the one you expected but this is a very special situation that requires special expertise.

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Subject: Lamp
Question:

Lamp
Hello-I was wondering if you could tell me how old this lamp is and how much it is worth and where it came from. I could not find any stamps or any names on it that might help find out what company makes it or where it comes from. Thank you for your time and expertise, it is greatly appreciated. S. Johnson


Answer: Sorry but this question requires completion of our LAMP APPRAISAL QUESTIONNAIRE and cannot be addressed in this venue.

Please email your request or visit our website http://www.hoylelamps.com/Lamp%20Appraisals%20Plus%20Lamp%20History.htm

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Subject: Kitchen Pendant Light
Question: We would like to replace a light fixture that hangs over the kitchen table. The 3 way switch is on the bottom of the light itself. There is no wall switch. I haven't been able to find anything similar because I don't know what to call it when I google it. I can find pendant lamps but their switches are not on the lamp itself, they are wired to a wall switch. Do you recognize the design?

Answer: Yes, this type of light switch located directly on the fixture was fairly common during the 1930's-1950's. Unfortunately it is highly unlikely that you will find it being used today on a new fixture.

We perform this type of conversion on many fixtures that our customers bring into our lamp shop. I suggest that you consult with a professional lamp and lighting repair company that is experienced and qualified to make this conversion. Be sure to consult with them prior to buying your fixture in order to make certain the fixture that you like can be converted properly.

Subject: Jim-
Question: Jim, quick question if ok-

We have browns in our living room furniture including a dark leather chair w/ ottomon w/ a dark oak coffee table and end table.

We wanted to replace the lighting in the living room and we've discovered two floor lamps with a silver base and a copper table lamp of the exact design but obviously the table lamp has a copper base while the two floor lamps are silver.

I certainly won't hold you to this, but in your opinion would this work, Jim? Just curious about what you might think-here again, if you say yes and it winds up being a no, I won't hold ya to it~.

Thank you ever so much for your willingness to help here.

Kevin

Answer: The room you described could work with these lamps but only if the overall look of the room is contemporary-modern. However, dark oak and dark leather do not sound like it is a contemporary setting.

Copper colors work great with oak and leather but the silver lamps seem very out of place.

Good luck with your project.


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Comment: Thank you Jim for all the extra information. We are going to definately put alot of thought about if and where we install these fixtures.
Questioner: Elizabeth
Category: Lighting Design
Private: No View Published Answer

Subject: potlights in kitchen
Question: Hi Jim, I wasnt able to repond to you via the regular way, not sure why I didnt get the email regarding the question you had. Yes what we consider potlights are recessed lights in the ceiling. Thanks Elizabeth

Answer: This is an excellent question which is often posed about recess lighting and mainly because of the very special considerations these fixtures require.

Here are some general features of recess lighting that may not initially be obvious. First, let's address this type of lighting in general. Recess lighting is among the most expensive type of lighting to install. A separate electrical junction outlet must be created in your ceiling by the electrician for each fixture. This includes a large canister which requires special attention to restoring the ceiling insulation at each fixture area. Plus there is the added cost of cutting into the ceiling for each fixture. Each fixture then becomes a source of leakage for your air conditioning and heating. Recess lighting is quite permanent because it requires such a substantial remodel effort to reconfigure this type of lighting. Recess lighting is also among the most inefficient lighting because it directs the light straight down with very little spread. Recess lighting requires a lot more overall wattage (energy usage) than most any other type of lighting fixture. There is the added inconvenience of changing the bulbs up inside the ceiling which are notorious for becoming stuck inside the electrical sockets. Additionally, bulbs for recess lighting fixtures are specialized to direct light downward and these bulbs are among the most expensive.

These facts should be considered carefully before deciding on recess lighting.

Recess lighting works best when each fixture is considered and placed individually. Normally you would not place them any closer together than 3-4' apart. They should be specifically located not randomly. If you want the walls washed in light then they need to be 1-2' from the wall. If they are placed uniformly, then you may end up with a somewhat commercial look. The number of fixtures depends on the exact configuration of your kitchen along with the furnishings, tables, cabinets, bar, etc. This requires detailed study of the specific blueprints of your kitchen and cannot be addressed in this venue.

Track lighting is an option that you may want to consider for this kitchen. It eliminates most all of the shortcomings of recess lighting and there are a great variety of styles to consider.

I apologize in advance for any limitations in my response and I hope these ideas prove helpful to you and your family.

Good luck on your project.

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Subject: size of mirror
Question: Hi Jim, I have a powder room that is 39 1/2 inches wide. My vanity is 36 in wide. If I put a mirror that is 24 in wide and the wall sconces are 6 inches in width (there are two of them. Will that look too crowded. What shape mirror would look the best? Thank you so much. Sue

Answer: That actually sounds like a very good option and does not seem crowded with 6" wide sconces.

A 36" or so long rectangular or oval mirror should be vertically oriented for best effect.

Good luck with your project.

Subject: table lamps
Question: couch configuration in middle of room not allowing table lamps to be used due to sockets only in walls. Do not want to put sockets in floor in case of change somewhere down line. Are there cordless lamps/what else can I put on end tables for a homey, comfy feel.

Answer: Lamps would be best but statues, figures, planters, art objects, anything that is interesting and beautiful to behold.

Battery operated lamps are greatly disappointing.

In our great room, we use drop cords running under the sofa to plug our lamps into.

Good luck.

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Subject: pot lights in kitchen
Question: We would like to install potlights around the perimeter of our 16 x 16 kitchen. We will also have other lighting like undercabinet and mini pendants over the island and sink. How many potlights should we install and how far apart should they be. Should they be randomly located or should be specifically located over the centre of certain cabinets in the kitchen. Also what distance from the wall should they be. Thank you for your help.

Answer: I am ready to answer your inquiry but first please describe exactly what it is you are referring to as a "POTLIGHT".

Is this a can light, recessed in the ceiling ?

I just want to make sure before venturing an answer.

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Subject: bathroom lighting
Question: QUESTION: I have an 80" vanity. Each end of the vanity has 4" flutes (filler) near the wall, then 24" bowls. In the center I have a 24" make up area. We are having a mirror installed from the counter to the ceiling (crown), and we plan to install the lights on the mirror. Should we install the lights above the bowls or centered on the mirrored wall? If we install them directly above the bowls will the lighting be ok over the make up area? Also, I have a choice of 18" or 25.5" 3 light bar shining downward. Which would work best?

ANSWER: A 3 down light fixture mounted in the center of the wall around 7' off the floor will provide adequate light for an 80" vanity. The 25.5" fixture is sized more appropriately and should spread the light a little more evenly but this is not critical in this situation.

Look for a fixture with maximum wattage of at least 60 and preferably 100 watts. Select one that will allow you to use the compact fluorescent bulbs which will reduce energy use, heat and save money.

Good luck on your lighting project.


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QUESTION: Would one centered 3 down light over an 80 " vanity be better than one above each bowl?

Answer: Two fixtures will of course provide more over all light than one fixture, but assuming you have adequate lighting in the rest of this room, it may not be necessary.

Which is "BETTER" becomes a preference issue but a single fixture directly over the makeup area seems to make more sense.

Good luck.

Subject: bathroom lighting
Question: I have an 80" vanity. Each end of the vanity has 4" flutes (filler) near the wall, then 24" bowls. In the center I have a 24" make up area. We are having a mirror installed from the counter to the ceiling (crown), and we plan to install the lights on the mirror. Should we install the lights above the bowls or centered on the mirrored wall? If we install them directly above the bowls will the lighting be ok over the make up area? Also, I have a choice of 18" or 25.5" 3 light bar shining downward. Which would work best?

Answer: A 3 down light fixture mounted in the center of the wall around 7' off the floor will provide adequate light for an 80" vanity. The 25.5" fixture is sized more appropriately and should spread the light a little more evenly but this is not critical in this situation.

Look for a fixture with maximum wattage of at least 60 and preferably 100 watts. Select one that will allow you to use the compact fluorescent bulbs which will reduce energy use, heat and save money.

Good luck on your lighting project.
merce
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Comment: Thanks for your quick and helpful response. I'm shopping for a fixture that meets your specs!
Questioner: Ann
Category: Lighting Design
Private: No View Published Answer

Subject: flush mount light over dining table
Question: My dining room table (60X30, rectangular, oak, double-pedestal, heirloom) and the view behind it is visible from the front entrance of my home.The back wall of the room consists of oak french doors opening to a screened porch; the doors are flanked w/floor to ceiling windows. This glass affords a panoramic view of our backyard w/gazebo and inground pool as well as the river w/dock and firepit area. My ceilings are 9'.

I don't want the light fixture over the table to compete w/ or overshadow this wonderful view. Could I use a flush mount fixture or do you have other suggestions? I've been looking at traditional fixtures with an aged bronze or black finish.

Also, I would like to replace the current ceiling fixture in my entryway to match or coordinate w/that over the table.

Thanks for your help!


Answer: A flush mount fixture usually tends to seem lost over a dining table.

Your room has the perfect layout to consider a double (2 light) down light island style fixture over this table. Look for one that has a more compact vertical design so that it will not come down too low over the table. This type fixture is less obtrusive than a typical chandelier because there are only 2 lights mounted on a decorative bar. Consider one that has an over all height less than 30" and mount it with enough chain to suit your view preferences. Typically a dining room chandelier should be mounted 30-36" above the table. However you may want to change this so that it will not block your view. Today you can find some island fixtures that will allow you to use up to 100 - 150 watt bulbs which will be more than adequate lighting for a table your size no matter how far from the table that you mount it. Some fixtures limit bulbs to 60 watts maximum. Be sure to check the fixture label carefully for wattage limitation. I suggest that you consider compact fluorescent bulbs which will save energy, reduce heat and save money.

A bronze finish fixture is perfect with the heirloom table and oak doors and black will also work nicely.

You did a great job describing your room and lighting requirements.

Good luck on this very interesting project. I can almost visualize the gorgeous view !

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Subject: BATHROOM MIRRORS
Question: QUESTION: I HAVE A LARGE BATHROOM WITH L SHAPED CABINETS - HIS AND HER SINKS BUT THE CABINET IS CONNECTED. I HAVE HUNG TWO LARGE MIRRORS VERTICALLY OVER EACH SINK AS ONE SIDE IS LARGER THAN THE OTHER AND IT LOOKED WIERD TO CENTER. CAN I HANG TWO MIRRORS OVER THE LARGER PORTION AND ONE OVER THE SMALLER PORTION

ANSWER: I apologize but I am a little confused by the description.
I understand the L shaped connecting cabinets and his and her sinks but do I understand correctly that it looks weird to center each mirror at each sink ?

If this is correct then it may be more appropriate to use sheet mirrors (from your local glass company) glued to the wall behind each sink and simply make each mirror the appropriate size in relation to the sink area. Or you can have the sheet mirrors cover all or any portion of the wall in that area.

Two mirrors at one sink seems a bit odd in design.

Good luck on your bathroom project.


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Actually one mirror would be centered over each sink - but adding a third mirror over a vanity that is next to the sink - do you think it would be odd to have two mirrors on one wall? The walls are not the same length that is the problem one is much larger than the other.

Answer: Yes, two mirrors on one wall seems odd.
The sheet mirrors that I mentioned previously would be a solution.

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Subject: BATHROOM MIRRORS
Question: I HAVE A LARGE BATHROOM WITH L SHAPED CABINETS - HIS AND HER SINKS BUT THE CABINET IS CONNECTED. I HAVE HUNG TWO LARGE MIRRORS VERTICALLY OVER EACH SINK AS ONE SIDE IS LARGER THAN THE OTHER AND IT LOOKED WIERD TO CENTER. CAN I HANG TWO MIRRORS OVER THE LARGER PORTION AND ONE OVER THE SMALLER PORTION

Answer: I apologize but I am a little confused by the description.
I understand the L shaped connecting cabinets and his and her sinks but do I understand correctly that it looks weird to center each mirror at each sink ?

If this is correct then it may be more appropriate to use sheet mirrors (from your local glass company) glued to the wall behind each sink and simply make each mirror the appropriate size in relation to the sink area. Or you can have the sheet mirrors cover all or any portion of the wall in that area.

Two mirrors at one sink seems a bit odd in design.

Good luck on your bathroom project.

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Comment: Thanks so much for your quick and informative reponse! While we are a bit far to get to your lamp repair shop (we are in Philadelphia PA) I checked out your website and will be shopping on it! (We still have a few more purchases to make for our new home.) Thanks again! Barb
Questioner: Barb
Category: Lighting Design
Private: No View Published Answer

Subject: kitchen lighting
Question: I have purchased a kitchen light (which turns out to be non-returnable. It is a
"pendant chandelier" hanging 27" from the ceiling. This is too low for our
kitchen. Is there any way to convert this type of light to a flush-mount or semi
flush-mount or to shorten the length? Thanks, Barb

Answer: Likely, but this is a job for an experienced professional. Customers bring this type of chandelier or fixture situation to us regularly and we shorten the rod/chain/pipe or other so that the fixture fits their room properly.

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Subject: exterior lighting
Question: I had bought in anticipation of building a new home some 19" high coach lanterns last year at a closing out sale. Now I am looking for a hanging pendant that would coordinate with these lanterns as there is none in the same family as the lanterns. I have found one that I like but the size is 40" high. Would that look alright with the size of the 19" coach lanterns or would it dwarf them. Is there a rule of thumb about about coordinating exterior lighting sizes? Thanks for your advise.

Answer: The exterior coach lanterns should be sized in proportion to the house size. The size of the porch or portico (or other room ?) will be the determining factor in selecting the appropriate size pendants and other fixtures. Generally, larger spaces demand larger lighting fixtures and vice versa. Using a very large light fixture coordinated with a much smaller one is likely to appear odd.

Good luck on your lighting project.

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Subject: height of pendants
Question: I'm hanging four 4" square 12v pyramid-shaped pendants over a 5' long dining table under 1 very tall (170") ceiling. The table is about 30" high. How high off the floor or over the table should the pendants hang?

Answer: Adequate lighting over a dining table is traditionally achieved by some variation of an incandescent chandelier or other fixture that uses 60 watt up to 100 watt light bulbs. The lighting output by the pendants in question is likely to be considerably subdued in comparison. Normally, dining room fixtures such as chandeliers are mounted so the bottom is around 36" above the table top and pendants so the bottom is around 44" above the table top.

Many of the pendants available today have a very low light output. Since your pendants are 12 volt models with a very small size, I will assume these have relatively low light output as well. It would be a good idea to check the LUMENS (light output) of each pendant and compare this with the light output of a typical 60 watt incandescent bulb which is around 600-800 LUMENS. Note: WATTAGE is not a measurement of light output. It is the measurement of energy usage. LUMENS is the measurement of light output. To compare efficiency of two different light fixtures, calculate the total LUMENS output of the fixture divided by the total WATTAGE usage of the fixture. This gives you LUMENS PER WATT. The more LUMENS PER WATT, the more efficient which means more light for less money.

When possible select fixtures that allow you to use the economical CFL bulbs (compact fluorescent). Currently these are the most economical bulbs available. LED bulbs are being developed that will far surpass anything we have imagined in light output, life span and economy. But these will not be widely available for a few years.

Good luck with your lighting project.

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Subject: bathroom lighting
Question: I have two small bathrooms. One has a 29" vanity and the other a 37" vanity. Do I need a three light or four light fixture for these?

Answer: A two light fixture mounted over the mirror is usually adequate in a powder room but a three light will provide adequate vanity lighting in a
medium bathroom. If you specifically want lots of light then install a four light fixture. You can always reduce the light output by changing to lower output light bulbs.

Be sure to select fixtures that allow you to use the economical CFL bulbs (compact fluorescent).

Good luck with your lighting project.

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Subject: Lighting over powder room mirror and correct mirror size
Question: We are remodeling powder room. Would love help on what size oval mirror should go over 24in wide pedestal oval sink? And should it be an up or down light bar above for best reflection? Should it be a two or three light bar? There is no room for side lighting. Really appreciate your help.

Answer: A couple decades ago it was traditional to use a petite mirror in the powder room just large enough to see your face and neck. Today in new homes, you are more likely to see a 24" wide and 36" long mirror over the sink. The larger mirror is not only more practical but it seems to add space to an already somewhat crowded room.

I suggest using a 24-28" wide mirror that is around 36" tall.

The best lighting is achieved by a down light bar mounted over the mirror. A 2 light bar will be adequate or you can use a somewhat compact 3 light bar. However, a larger 3 light bar may be over powering for the powder room. Try to select a fixture that will allow you to use the economical compact fluorescent, CFL bulbs.

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Subject: outside pendant
Question: My front entrance which has a stucco portico above it would look great with a hanging exterior pendant above the front door. I have a 3.6 ft space between the top of the door/transom and the ceiling of the portico. My concern is even with the portico as we are in a waterfront community it can be very windy, I dont want the fixture to swing. I have tried to find both at my local stores and through the Internet exterior pendants that come with rods instead of chains. Do you know of any suppliers who sell something like this? If not, it is possible to convert a fixture from a chain to a rod easily? Thanks for your advice.

Answer: It may not be easy to find the style fixture you want that is already fitted with a rigid rod. You will likely have to do an extensive search.

It is a fairly straight forward project to remove the chain from a fixture and replace it with a rod. The difficult part is finding someone to do it professionally. We do this type job regularly in our lamp/lighting shop but finding a full service shop in your area to do this may be challenging.

Be sure that the rod is adequate in diameter and strength to support the fixture and prevent lateral movement. Shorter rods will be more stable than longer ones. Also make sure that heavy duty hardware is used so that there will not be a maintenance issue later on.

If you are able to find a suitable shop to do this alteration, it would be a good idea to first get their feedback on any specific fixture that you like prior to purchasing it.

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Subject: Entry foyer Lighting
Question: We have a 2 story entry, approximately 15-16'. We are deciding between 2 light fixtures. They are around 74 1/2" in height. Is this long enough? Also, how much lighting do we need. Is 180 watts enough?

Answer: In order to be of service, I need some additional information below.
1) Measurements of the floor space in this foyer ?
2) Ceiling height in foyer ?
3) Is there any other lighting in this area ?
4) Is there a stairway at or in the foyer ?
5) Brief description of the foyer/entry layout with accompanying measurements ?
6) Total square footage of the entire house ?
7) What is the width of the fixtures under consideration ?
8) Please confirm that the fixtures are 74.5" long which is just over 6 feet. I assume this does not include the hanging chain and that it is the fixture only measurement. Please confirm ?

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Subject: 12"extension/projection bathroom vanity light
Question: I found a medicine chest that was a steal, is exactly what I wanted and fits in with the families needs. It is 7.5 inches deep. Lighting over the sink, where this will be placed will be the only light in the 5x8 space. I hate light bars (I have them now)I have only found one light from Renovation hardware that fits the bill. Do I really need a 12" extension (projection from the wall )? Do you know of any one who sells these? Help , I have done an exhaustive search on the internet in stores. Thank you in advance.

Answer: The best option is to check with your local lighting showrooms. Most will have a very extensive variety of lighting from many suppliers from which to choose.

Good luck.

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Subject: bathroom lighting over vanity
Question: We have a 2 bowl 5' wide vanity with 5’ wide mirror above vanity. We are raising the vanity and installing a light through mirror, above vanity. The light we have chosen is a cylindrically shaped sconce and would hang horizontally over mirror. We are considering installing one over each sink; each has 2, 60W T type bulbs. Question: how far from floor should the fixture be installed. Thank you.

Answer: Sconces work well around 7' off the floor which is well above eye level to reduce glare.

Good luck on your project.

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Comment: Dear Mr. Hoyle, Thank you for your advice and the education on wattage vs. lumens. We will use a cream colored stucco for the exterior with classic black fixtures, double iron/glass ornamental door and iron balcony railings for a formal look. Best to you, Merlene
Questioner: Merlene
Category: Lighting Design
Private: No View Published Answer

Subject: proper scale for light fixutres
Question: I have a foyer with a butterfly staircase, 20'ceilings, and 18' width. What diameter of a chandelier should I hang?

Also, what size front entry coach lights for this 2 story, stucco house? Is there guidelines as to what size of light to use for foyers and coach lights?

I am building the house below

http://www.tollbros.com/homesearch/servlet/HomeSearch?app=model_floorplans_large&plan_id=45924&floorplan=69848

Answer: Large foyers call for large chandeliers. Since this foyer width and height is near the size of an average great room, a 36" wide chandelier will be right at home here. Anything smaller than 30" wide will seem lost. Look for an 8 light minimum and hang it so that the bottom of the chandelier is around 12 feet or so off the floor. Make sure you have extra chain and wiring on the fixture so that you can lengthen or shorten per your personal preference.

Coach lights work best by mounting them so that the center of the light is around 7 feet off the floor. This eliminates eye glare and provides good lighting for the entry. Consider ones that are around 18-20" high and 8-10" wide with 3-4 light sockets each.

The most basic size guideline for lighting fixtures is simply relativity. Larger areas require larger physical size fixtures as well as larger light output. Keep in mind that although WATTAGE is often used as a light output guide, it is actually a measurement of ELECTRICITY USAGE. LUMENS is the actual measurement of LIGHT OUTPUT and can be found on the manufacturers light bulb package.

Be sure to use CFL bulbs (compact fluorescent) where possible and you will get much more light output (LUMENS) and use much less energy with much less heat. You will also save a considerable amount of money. Avoid halogen bulbs of all kinds. They are unusually hot, expensive to buy, expensive to operate and these bulbs are notorious for burning out quickly.

I was intrigued with the similarities of your house plans with my own home.

Congratulations on building your new home and good luck with your lighting projects.

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Subject: size of light fixture over a 60" round dining glass tabletop
Question: Dear Jim:

I have a glass-topped mahogony base dining room table. it is 60" round with a beveled edge. The ceiling in the dining area is about 12' high. What are the guidelines for the appropriate size (width) light fixture to hang over this table? also, the suggested distance from the bottom of the light fixture to the tabletop.

Thanks for your help.

Aloha,
Kathy

Answer: A 60" table pairs well with an 8 light chandelier which is around 24" wide. The bottom of the chandelier should be around 30-36" from the table top. This arrangement provides adequate lighting on the table while keeping the light source well above eye level and eliminating glare.

I hope your lighting project is successful.

Good luck.

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Subject: Bathroom Light Sconces
Question: I am ripping out the builders "glued to the wall"type of mirror and buying a rectangular mirror with a sconce on either side. I currently have a recessed light in the soffit above. Can I leave the recessed light and maybe just put a lower watt bulb in it instead of closing it off completely? The sconces are uplights. Also, I have heard the sconces should be 60 inches off the floor but it seems too low. My ceilings are 9ft (about 8ft below the soffit). Thanks!

Answer: Using a lower wattage bulb (compact fluorescent) seems to make more sense.

Sconces work well around 6.5' - 7' off the floor, well above eye level to reduce glare.

Good luck on your project.

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Subject: dining room lighting - square or rectangular?
Question: We have an 8-person rectangular dining table, with extension leaves. Since we are forced to move the table round 90 degrees when using the extension leaves we were thinking of installing a square lighting fixture instead of a rectangular one over the middle of the table - will this look ok?

Answer: It may but why not consider a round or oblong chandelier instead ?
Chandeliers should hang so that the bottom of the chandelier is approximately 30-36" from the table top. Consider one with at least 8 lights preferably more.

Good luck.

Subject: Lamp info
Question: Thank you for taking the time to offer assistance.

We bought a pair of lamps recently at an auction. The lamps have the old cloth covered cord; are of opaque clear glass (not white or other color, just thick -- like clouds); each has a tall structure like a building of sorts with horizontal zig-zags next to a naked woman sitting with her legs off to her left; left arm down, right arm up in a curve, head tilted back and up at hand. Looks as if that right arm is in/holding up cloth. I have photos.

Additionally, we have an unknown item. I can't even guess the heading it would fall under. Maybe you can help or pass this on to someone else? It looks like a giant shoe horn with a lion's head for the handle wearing a crown. The head and "pedestal" are just some type of silver metal (12" maybe), but the "horn" might be brass and is maybe 16" in length. There is a design on the back that should help identify, but you'd have to have a picture.

Thanks for any help you may be able to provide,

Mary

Answer: This is the type of question that I received almost daily. It is necessary to see photos of the lamp and markings in order to help. You can email me directly or through my website below.

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Subject: Making a Fire Out of Lights
Question: Hello,

I am working on a project for my job. I am trying to simulate a fire by using little Christmas lights in red, orange, yellow, and white.

Do stores sell those type of lights year round? Also, if they do, how would you recommend I go about doing it? Thanks for any assistance.

Megan

Answer: This sounds like very interesting project but I have no idea or experience with this type of lighting.

Good luck and sorry I could not be of service.

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Subject: exterior coach lanterns
Question: At what height would I install 19" Coach Lanterns. My door is 6'8", I have a 14" rectangle shape transom above the door and also a 3 ft half circle transom above that transom.
Thanks

Answer: These wall fixtures work best when they are located so that the center of the fixture is around 7' from the floor. This placement provides good light for the doorway entry while minimizing glare to the eyes.

Good luck with your lighting project !

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Subject: Dining Room Lighting
Question: What is the distance suppose to be from the top of the dining room table to the bottom of the hanging light fixture? My table is 29" tall. My ceilings are 10".
Thank You,
Paul & Terry Hill

Answer: A good rule of thumb is to hang your dining room fixture so that the bottom of the fixture is around 36" from the top of the table. This arrangement provides good lighting on the table while placing the lights well above eye level thereby eliminating glare.

Good luck with your lighting project.

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Subject: Dining room chandelier.
Question: I moved into a new house two weeks ago and while I was cleaning I broke the glass lamp on one of the arms of a chandelier over the dining room table. I cannot find the name of the manufacturer anywhere, but there is a serial number. I love the chandelier and would love to replace the broken part...any ideas on how to find the manufacturer?

Answer: No, but I may POSSIBLY ??? be able to help but I will need the following information:
1) Photo of one of the existing glass shades
2) Photo of where and how it fits onto the glass holder
3) Measurements

You can send it directly to my email.

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Subject: 3 pane bathroom mirror with built in T8
Question: 3 hollow frame 1-1/2" deep panes with mirror on top and with T8 bluit in in every pane. middle pane fixed [with disguised connection to el outlet in ceiling]. 2 side panes with hinges [half the width of the fixed pane]. what to use for a sturdy el wire connection between the fixed pane and the hinged pane in a way that the el wire is not visible in opened and fully closed position.
for obviuos reasons i do not want to use the cabinet hinges as el conduits as they will be exposed and can be touched. do you know another nice way to disguise the el connection between the fixed and moving panel?

Answer: I apologize for the delay in answering your inquiry as I have been out of town for several days.

I am further sorry that I am not able to answer this question without a schematic or photo that would help me to better understand the situation.

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Subject: vanity lighting
Question: QUESTION: Hi Jim, what height would I install lights over a double sink vanity in a bathroom where the ceiling is 10 feet high. The windows are at 8 feet in this bathroom in case that matters. thanks for your time.

ANSWER: Use 1 single mirror running the entire vanity width and reaching up to at least 7.5' high off the floor. Place the fixtures so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Jim, I dont have the room to install the fixtures beside the mirror. If I install the light fixtures above the mirrors at what height would work best. thanks again

Answer: Vanity light fixtures offer the best light distribution when mounted over the sink so that the lowest part of the fixture is about 6.5 - 7' off the floor.

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Subject: fixture heights.
Question: QUESTION: Hi Jim, I have a double entry, split foyer with 2 sets of stairs. Not sure whether I want wall sconces on each side or a chandelier between the two stairs. But what height would I install each of these fixtures. thank you.

ANSWER: I am happy to assist you after receiving some additional information.
How high is the ceiling in the foyer ?
What are the dimensions of the foyer ?

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: the ceiling height is 13 feet. The dimensions of the foyer are two fold, that is why I am considering having both scones and a chandelier... landing at door entrance before the staircase is 5 ft deep x 16 ft wide; where double sets of stairs are is 8 feet deep by 11 feet wide.

Answer: By using a larger chandelier with 8-12 bulbs you can eliminate the sconces altogether unless you just prefer to have sconces anyway. The chandelier should be mounted so that the bottom is at least 9' from the floor so that you get more even light distribution. The bottom of the sconces should be at least 6.5 - 7' from the floor so that the light is above eye level.

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your foyer is well lit for you and your family.

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Subject: vanity lighting
Question: Hi Jim, what height would I install lights over a double sink vanity in a bathroom where the ceiling is 10 feet high. The windows are at 8 feet in this bathroom in case that matters. thanks for your time.

Answer: Use 1 single mirror running the entire vanity width and reaching up to at least 7.5' high off the floor. Place the fixtures so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

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Subject: fixture heights.
Question: Hi Jim, I have a double entry, split foyer with 2 sets of stairs. Not sure whether I want wall sconces on each side or a chandelier between the two stairs. But what height would I install each of these fixtures. thank you.

Answer: I am happy to assist you after receiving some additional information.
How high is the ceiling in the foyer ?
What are the dimensions of the foyer ?

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Subject: Vanity lighting
Question: We purchased a Rothdale double sink 74"vanity with 2 large matching mirrors
each measuring 18" x 41". The vanity is 35" high with a 3" backsplash. I have
2 questions. How high off the counter should the mirror begin and where to
put the overhead lights? We have 9 ft ceilings. We need to do our electric
like....tomorrow! We had our eye on a double light fixture that measures 8" H
x 14"L and extends out only 5". We thought the tripple light fixture would be
too top heavy for the furniture and space. Problem is that the top ledge of the
mirror is 4"
thick. Do I invert the lights so they point up?
Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated!
Be well,
Bernice

Answer: Put the mirror all the way down to the back splash and use a 2-3 light down light fixture with non clear glass shades directly over each bowl. Place the fixtures with the light pointed downward so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

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Subject: table lamp
Question: It was many years ago, but I can recall seeing table lamps where the shade
turned. It was a nature scene on the shade. Perhaps the heat from the bulb
made the shade turn on its own. I haven't seen one for many years, and so
perhaps they are no longer being made. Do you know what this kind of lamp
is called? Or where I can get one?

Answer: A very interesting lamp!

Can you believe that this style lamp originated as far back as circa 1920's and became extremely popular during the 1950's when TV lamps were in high demand. The shade was a drum style made with a louvered or fan blade top so that the heat from the bulb rising through the top louvers would slowly turn the shade. Some models had a translucent painted scene on an exterior shell which did not move and the moving painted drum on the inside would imply motion to the painted scene. Popular themes were moving water scenes, rivers, Niagara Falls and a little boy peeing, ha!

I have a heavy metal Niagara Falls lamp from around 1930 that is absolutely awesome especially in a darkened room. It is made like a very decorative 3 dimensional metal picture frame on an ornate stand. There is no shade but where the picture would be is the Niagara Falls scene and it looks like the falls are in motion.

You can occasionally find one of these MOTION LAMPS at an antique store or a flea market. It is very difficult to find one that works properly because many of the parts are easily lost or broken. You may also find one listed for sale on EBay. The nicer ones usually sell for many hundreds of dollars.

Motion lamps are still being made today but unfortunately they are very inexpensive cheap novelty models made in China. Do a Google search for MOTION LAMPS to learn more.

I hope you find this information useful. It is always a pleasure to correspond with someone who appreciates antique lamps. Good luck in locating one that you will enjoy.

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PS: I locate special antique lamps for customers and I can be contacted through my website above.
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Subject: Redec. a garage into a bedroom
Question: Hello Jim,

I will be brief I am certain you are busy. I am moving into a house with a special needs person as a favor to a family. The family is converting the garage into a bedroom for me. It is 400 sq. feet.

The only natural light I will have is the 3 windows in the garage door.

Here are my questions:

What colors would be best to lighten up the room?
Any thoughts on a general carpet color?
Any lighting ideas or thoughts? A certain lamp or light fixture to buy or where to place it?
Ever been apart of or have any advice on how to make this as nice as possible?

I am also going to use the room as an office with a large chair.

Do you have any advice on where I should place/the optimum set up would be.

Jim what of these question is part of your expertise?

Thank you very much!!!!
I appreciate your time,

Chris

Answer: I apologize for the delay as my internet connection has been spotty over the last several days.

Light colors such as whites, off whites, cream, eggshell, light gold, yellow, light greens and blues will always brighten up a room compared to rich bold colors.

The floor covering is very important because of the large area. Avoid dark colors such as browns or the darker earth tones. Brighter means more reflection and better lighting.

As far as lighting, a central chandelier will provide the most efficient light source. Crystal, white and brass are the most reflective colors and therefore provide the most light. Avoid a dark color chandelier. 400 square feet is a large room so consider a minimum 8 light chandelier with dimmer switch. Torchiere (up light) floor lamps will also add general area lighting as they bounce light off the ceiling and are very efficient in lighting an area.

Avoid halogen lighting bulbs of any kind as these are extremely hot and very inefficient. Fluorescent is the most efficient so try to incorporate this type of bulb into any lamps or fixtures that you decide upon.

I hope these ideas prove to be helpful and that you end up with a beautiful and well lit room.

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Subject: Lamp shade choice
Question: I have two traditional side lamps in my living room. They are made of wood, medium to dark in colour, with the main stem twisting up from a circular base to the bulb. They each stand about 60cms tall and sit on small side tables.

My living room is beginning to look like a brown colour pallette - dark antique desks and tables mixed in with a brown (slightly orange sofa). The floor is a medium/light laminate wood effect and the walls very light cream. I'm keen to bring in a little colour in a tasteful way, as its generally quite dark.

However, I'm a bloke without any clue of interior design. I was thinking of a dark red shade but I'm worried this might look quite gothic!

In addition to colour, what size shade and what shape is best?

Answer: It sounds like your room could use some brightening up.

Because of the general dark appearance it would be better to incorporate something brighter but not too bright. For instance, some variation of medium to lighter color antique gold finish lamps would fit in nicely with your existing decor. Cream or champagne color shades would not only go nicely with the lamps, they will lighten up the room. Stay away from reds or any other dark or rich color shades as these will only add to the heavy darker look and feel of the room.

Consider taller lamps around 30" (76cm) which will also add more light to the room. When I first started in business in 1979, nearly all lamp sales were in pairs. Now we are as likely to sell mismatched lamps (and shades) as we are to sell pairs. This adds interest to the room as well as allowing beautiful lamps to stand on their own. When you use pairs, you dilute the perceived value and interest of each lamp. If this idea fits your personal preferences, I would also recommend that you do not use matching shades, this will break the monotony of the color scheme in the room and add a new dimension of interest and light to your room.

I hope these ideas prove to be helpful.

Good luck on your new lighting project.

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Subject: Old kerosene lamp (floor type) and the missing shade
Question: My husband inherited an old lamp that has three separate 'lights' that are for kerosene or oil and the 'shades' are missing and I have searched for about two hours trying to locate similar ones...I found a site, then, our electricity went out briefly and then, I could NOT relocate that site. Maybe I am just too tired and not thinking straight anymore. It is nearly 1:30 a.m. Anyway, the diameter is probably about 12" across and the 'arms' that would hold the shade are maybe 10" (+/-) and have a little bit of a 'dip' where we suppose the lamp shade would rest. I am in hopes that you might at least point us in a direction that we might locate a shade or possibly globes? Thanks in advance for any help you might provide.

Answer: In order to help you with this issue, a couple good photos and some very accurate measurements are absolutely essential.

There are literally thousands of possibilities that must be narrowed down to what will fit your lamp.

If you will send accurate measurements and photos, I will be more than happy to try and help you.

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Subject: Lighting for Vanity
Question: I am re-doing a bath and will have a 78" vanity. The vanity will have a bank of drawers of 18" in the middle between the two sinks. I was planning on a mirror the full width of the vanity, with fluorescent tube fixtures installed vertically on the mirror, on both sides of the each of the 2 sinks. This means that each tube fixture would be approximately 19.5" apart. I just read some articles that state that the side lighting for a vanity should be anywhere from 28" to 36" apart. Why? What will be the problem with having the fixtures closer? Thank you! Elise

Answer: The light source that you describe is simply closer to your eyes and rather than providing adequate lighting for the area, the fixtures will be providing more light directly to your eyes. Also, since the fixtures are near eye level this will create some unwanted glare.

A more efficient arrangement places the fixtures well above your eye level, centered over each sink about 7' off the floor. This keeps direct light away from your eyes and reflects downward to your face, the mirror and sink area where you need it.

There are many fixtures designed for this application with arms that will direct the light downward where you need it. A fluorescent tube will also work in this same overhead location but it does not direct the light downward as efficiently.

I hope these ideas prove helpful and that you end up with a well lit and beautiful vanity area.

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Subject: How do i create this effect?
Question: I have a picture with some lighting on it, if I can have your e-mail I will forward it to you... i'm trying to figure out how to create this effect, thanks

Answer: You can access our email from any page of our website:http://www.hoylelamps.com/

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Subject: replacing recessed vanity light
Question: We recently purchased a home that has two vanity cabinets in the master bath, on opposite walls. Each cabinet is approximately 4' across.

In the ceiling above each cabinet is a soffet that extends the width of the cabinet and approximately 12" down from the ceiling and 10" out from the wall. In the soffet is a single recessed light.

The recessed light is the primary light for the vanity and the quality of light is poor because it is directed straight down, leaving shadows and gaps as you work at the sink.

Can you suggest any options for improving the lighting in this situation? I have considered installing a conversion kit for the recessed fixture, but the majority of the vanity lights I see are wall-mount, not ceiling mount. Not sure what to do.

Thanks,

Joey.

Answer: This sounds like a situation that could be corrected by one of several methods:
a small multi light chandelier
a flush mount fixture with multiple adjustable heads
a track light with multiple adjustable heads

I hope these suggestions prove helpful.

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Subject: LED lights in kitchen
Question: Hi. We're remodeling our kitchen and are planning to use LED lights for
recessed ceiling and undercabinet. I can't seem to find any information on
whether or not they will have an impact on the colour of our cabinets. Do
they have the same impact as fluorescent lights?

Thanks

Answer: Unfortunately, I cannot help you with this question as it is manufacturer specific. The lighting showroom where you are buying this item should have a professional who can quickly help you with this by contacting the manufacturer for you.

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Subject: CFL troubles
Question: QUESTION: We have been given contradictory informtion from a lighting store. We are
both getting older and my husband has vision problems, so we need all the
light we can get. 1. If a lamp socket is rated for 60 watts, is it safe for me to
put in up to a 60 watt cfl (250 watt equivalent).
2. We put 4 23 watt (100 equivalent bulbs) in one lamp and the wiring under
the socket burned the plastic protectors. In another it seems to be ok. Could something else be wrong?

ANSWER: I regret that my answer may not be the one you are expecting. Since there is definitely a problem due to the burning of the plastic protector, this is a job strictly for a professional and experienced lamp repair shop.

Please unplug the lamp and do not use it under any circumstances until the problem is corrected.

It would not be reasonable for me to venture a guess as to the problem without personal inspection of the lamp and the bulbs.

We have repaired and restored lamps for 29 years and the problem you described is very serious and has the potential to destroy property and lives.

PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS LAMP. TAKE IT TO A LAMP REPAIR SHOP ALONG WITH THE BULBS.

I am sorry that I could not be of more help with your question.


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thanks very much for the warning. It will be unplugged right away. Could you
also answer question # 1 theoretically, because this applies to other lamps that
appear to have no problem.




Answer: Wattage refers to the measurement of electricity or power that the bulb uses so 60 watts of electricity is the same.

The clearance between the bulb and the shade or other lamp components is also a factor so be certain that you have plenty of space between the bulb and any flammable or other component that may become hot to the touch.

However, be sure to check the manufacturers' label as this should be the final determining factor in the bulb type that can be used for a particular lamp or fixture.

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Subject: CFL troubles
Question: We have been given contradictory informtion from a lighting store. We are
both getting older and my husband has vision problems, so we need all the
light we can get. 1. If a lamp socket is rated for 60 watts, is it safe for me to
put in up to a 60 watt cfl (250 watt equivalent).
2. We put 4 23 watt (100 equivalent bulbs) in one lamp and the wiring under
the socket burned the plastic protectors. In another it seems to be ok. Could something else be wrong?

Answer: I regret that my answer may not be the one you are expecting. Since there is definitely a problem due to the burning of the plastic protector, this is a job strictly for a professional and experienced lamp repair shop.

Please unplug the lamp and do not use it under any circumstances until the problem is corrected.

It would not be reasonable for me to venture a guess as to the problem without personal inspection of the lamp and the bulbs.

We have repaired and restored lamps for 29 years and the problem you described is very serious and has the potential to destroy property and lives.

PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS LAMP. TAKE IT TO A LAMP REPAIR SHOP ALONG WITH THE BULBS.

I am sorry that I could not be of more help with your question.

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Subject: Using Dimmer switch with Compact Fluorescent Bulb
Question: I have two Wheel hub light fixtures (handmade) hooked to a dimmer switch in which I have been using regular light bulbs. They dim or brighten as desired. I wish to change to compact fluorescent bulbs. Will the dimmer switch still work? What type fluorescent bulbs would be required? If the present dimmer switch wouldn't work, what kind could be installed that would work with Compact Fluorescent bulbs?

Answer: It is not possible to generalize the answer to this question. Most CFL (compact fluorescent) bulbs cannot be used with a dimmer switch. However, you may be able to find some CFL's that can be used with a dimmer switch.

It is necessary to follow the manufacturers directions listed with each individual dimmer switch and with each individual CFL bulb in order to determine the correct usage.

I realize this may not be the answer you were seeking. Please be very careful in following manufacturers directions for this project.

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Subject: finding manuvactor of ceiling fan by model # and/or serial number
Question: I recently acquired a foreclosure property with a ceiling fan that needs a new light assembly ... I have no idea of the manufacturer, but have the model number and serial number ... can either of these be used to determine who made the fan and what light kits will work on this fan ...

Answer: You might try a Google search for the model number. For instance try a Google search with this phrase: "ceiling fan model 12345" and replace 12345 with the actual model number.

Sorry I could not be more helpful.

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Subject: chandelier for hall bathroom
Question: I want to buy a chandelier for the hall bath, which has a 10' ceiling and is 5'x5'. I am wondering if a 4 bulb or 6 bulb would be better, what the total watts should be, and whether I need lighting on the wall next to the mirror as well. Thanks for your help.

Answer: A 6 bulb chandelier will over power such a small area in physical size and in lighting. A 3-4 bulb chandelier will provide plenty of light for such a small area and be more appropriately sized. Generally, 60 watts per bulb is the maximum for chandeliers but be sure to check the manufacturer's labeling as this is the definitive wattage for any fixture.

Wall lighting in addition to the chandelier is not necessary as a 3-4 light chandelier will provide plenty of light, in fact you may find that using smaller wattage bulbs in the 3-4 bulb chandelier will still give plenty of light for this area.

I hope these ideas prove helpful.

Good luck on your lighting project.

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Subject: Dining Room Lighting
Question: We have a 100 year old dutch colonial home, and recently moved the rooms around. Our dining area now needs more light for evening dining, and we have no overheard lighting available. Please advise of any ideas you have. We have 2 lamps on the fireplace mantle, but they definitely do not do the job..Thanks in advance!!

Answer: The most efficient way to light this area is with a chandelier which requires overhead wiring. You should consider a torchiere floor lamp which points upward and bounces light off the ceiling. Also, 6 way floor lamps are perhaps the brightest lamps available and they combine typical floor lamp lighting along with a torchiere up light so you get the benefit of both kinds of lighting. These two lamp styles are by far the very best portable lamps for lighting up an area such as yours and the 6 way floor lamp is the most efficient.

I hope these suggestions prove helpful.

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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: QUESTION: I've taken your advice given some time ago and have ordered 2 sets of 3 lights for over my bathroom 67" vanity top. I am checking today about having the mirror drilled for light placement directly on the mirror. My bathroom is narrow (about 5'), but I think I should have an overhead light on the ceiling to light the back of my head. Is this correct? Can I use a recessed light here, probably centered between the two vanity bowls or is another type of light more appropriate?

I am also building a 6' by 11.5' walk-in closet. Will recessed lights work here? How many would I need? What about their placement?

Thank you so much for your invaluable help. It is much appreciated.

MaryLee

ANSWER: There are some serious drawbacks to recess lighting.
1) If the lighting design is ever changed, there are permanent holes to deal with in the ceiling. The ceiling will likely need extensive repairs or replacement.
2) Recess lighting is very inefficient and does not radiate light outward as well as many other fixtures.
3) If recess lighting is not placed very carefully from the beginning, there may be areas that are not lighted equally or adequately.
4) Recess lighting fixtures may reduce the efficiency of insulation and HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) systems.
5) Recess lighting fixtures use very specific bulbs which are more expensive compared to bulbs in many other fixtures.
6) Changing bulbs in recess lighting can be more difficult than many other fixtures.

To light the area behind (back of my head), you might consider a flush mount or hanging ceiling fixture which is easily installed and available in a wide variety of sizes and designs at economical prices.

I hope these ideas are of value and that your lighting plans brighten up your life.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you for your suggestions. Your info is very helpful. In figuring the lighting needs for the walk-in closet, is there a rule of thumb or some way to figure the number of lights or the wattage needed for the area?

MaryLee

ANSWER: The most important considerations for walk in closet lighting are the size, shape and the amount of time you would typically spend in the closet. Some walk in closets rival a den or study complete with dressing table, mirror, wall decor, etc.

If you will send me the measurements, shape, ceiling height, the typical amount of time you would normally spend in the walk in closet and any other details, I will try to suggest some ideas for your consideration.

- Jim

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: The walk-in closet is 6' wide by 11'6" deep with an 8' ceiling. There are two 34" windows side by side along the length of one wall. I plan to put an ironing board in front of the windows for touch-ups when getting dressed. The entry door is centered on a 6' wall. This room will just be a closet with hanger and shelf space around the windows/ironing board and doorway.

Answer: A simple flush ceiling mount fixture will be ideal for this size closet.
A 2 light fixture will offer more versatility. Look for one that allows enough space for CFL (compact fluorescent) bulbs which will save energy and reduce the heat output.

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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: QUESTION: I've taken your advice given some time ago and have ordered 2 sets of 3 lights for over my bathroom 67" vanity top. I am checking today about having the mirror drilled for light placement directly on the mirror. My bathroom is narrow (about 5'), but I think I should have an overhead light on the ceiling to light the back of my head. Is this correct? Can I use a recessed light here, probably centered between the two vanity bowls or is another type of light more appropriate?

I am also building a 6' by 11.5' walk-in closet. Will recessed lights work here? How many would I need? What about their placement?

Thank you so much for your invaluable help. It is much appreciated.

MaryLee

ANSWER: There are some serious drawbacks to recess lighting.
1) If the lighting design is ever changed, there are permanent holes to deal with in the ceiling. The ceiling will likely need extensive repairs or replacement.
2) Recess lighting is very inefficient and does not radiate light outward as well as many other fixtures.
3) If recess lighting is not placed very carefully from the beginning, there may be areas that are not lighted equally or adequately.
4) Recess lighting fixtures may reduce the efficiency of insulation and HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) systems.
5) Recess lighting fixtures use very specific bulbs which are more expensive compared to bulbs in many other fixtures.
6) Changing bulbs in recess lighting can be more difficult than many other fixtures.

To light the area behind (back of my head), you might consider a flush mount or hanging ceiling fixture which is easily installed and available in a wide variety of sizes and designs at economical prices.

I hope these ideas are of value and that your lighting plans brighten up your life.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you for your suggestions. Your info is very helpful. In figuring the lighting needs for the walk-in closet, is there a rule of thumb or some way to figure the number of lights or the wattage needed for the area?

MaryLee

Answer: The most important considerations for walk in closet lighting are the size, shape and the amount of time you would typically spend in the closet. Some walk in closets rival a den or study complete with dressing table, mirror, wall decor, etc.

If you will send me the measurements, shape, ceiling height, the typical amount of time you would normally spend in the walk in closet and any other details, I will try to suggest some ideas for your consideration.

- Jim
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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: I've taken your advice given some time ago and have ordered 2 sets of 3 lights for over my bathroom 67" vanity top. I am checking today about having the mirror drilled for light placement directly on the mirror. My bathroom is narrow (about 5'), but I think I should have an overhead light on the ceiling to light the back of my head. Is this correct? Can I use a recessed light here, probably centered between the two vanity bowls or is another type of light more appropriate?

I am also building a 6' by 11.5' walk-in closet. Will recessed lights work here? How many would I need? What about their placement?

Thank you so much for your invaluable help. It is much appreciated.

MaryLee

Answer: There are some serious drawbacks to recess lighting.
1) If the lighting design is ever changed, there are permanent holes to deal with in the ceiling. The ceiling will likely need extensive repairs or replacement.
2) Recess lighting is very inefficient and does not radiate light outward as well as many other fixtures.
3) If recess lighting is not placed very carefully from the beginning, there may be areas that are not lighted equally or adequately.
4) Recess lighting fixtures may reduce the efficiency of insulation and HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) systems.
5) Recess lighting fixtures use very specific bulbs which are more expensive compared to bulbs in many other fixtures.
6) Changing bulbs in recess lighting can be more difficult than many other fixtures.

To light the area behind (back of my head), you might consider a flush mount or hanging ceiling fixture which is easily installed and available in a wide variety of sizes and designs at economical prices.

I hope these ideas are of value and that your lighting plans brighten up your life.

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Subject: vanity
Question: Hi: We are doing 2 new vanities - one a 24" round and the other 30" rectangular
shape. What type of fixture will provide us with the most clear light with the
least amount of footprint? The 24 is for a girls bathroom very girlie and the
other is for our which has turned out to be a cross between traditional and
contemporary! Who knew!

Answer: For lighting a vanity area, the fixture providing the most light with the smallest footprint is a wall mount fixture with curved arms pointing downward from an oval metal decorative plate. These fixtures provide great lighting when mounted about 7' off the floor directly above the vanity.

The fixture arms are attached to a metal plate just a couple inches from each other. The arms curve down and outward from the plate thereby providing very good lateral light beneath the fixture. They are available with a wide assortment of glass shades, metal finishes and designs from contemporary to traditional.

I suggest purchasing a 3 light fixture for your larger vanity and a 2-3 light fixture for the smaller vanity. Make sure the fixtures have medium base sockets (fits a standard light bulb). You will then have a good selection of bulbs to choose from including the short CFL bulbs (compact fluorescent)which not only reduce heat but save considerable amount of energy.

I hope these ideas prove helpful with your new vanity and lighting project.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Lighting over Dining Table
Question: What size light should hang over a 60 inch round table and how high above the table should it be?

Answer: There are a number of considerations that will help provide the answers to your two questions.

What size is the room ? Is this a dining room or breakfast nook ? Is the lighting fixture in question a hanging chandelier type fixture ?

The main issue is the table size which is 60" diameter and generally this is considered a "moderate" size table. Assuming this table is located in a small to moderate size room such as a small dining area or a breakfast type nook then you would be considering a moderate size chandelier such as a 5-6 light fixture. A 4 light chandelier will likely be too small hanging over a 60" table. If the room is a larger size then you might consider an 8 light chandelier. Anything larger than 8 lights would likely be out of proportion with a 60" table.

The usual placement for a dining room chandelier is about 30-36" above the table. That means the bottom of the chandelier is 30-36" above the table top. This allows people at the table to look at and converse with each other without interference from the chandelier, yet hang low enough to provide good lighting for the table surface. In very large rooms, this measurement would likely increase.

Consider a dimmer for your dining chandelier as there may be times when you desire subtle accent light and other times when you want it as bright as possible. Many dining tables do double duty such as being used as a game table or as a part time office.

Tiffany style chandeliers are excellent choices over the dining table if very bright light is not your main goal. These chandeliers are unequaled in providing a romantic atmosphere. If you consider a Tiffany style chandelier, look for one that is around 22-24" wide and somewhere around 22-24" overall height although the height is not very critical in this situation.

Many good lighting showrooms employ professionals who work with these ideas on a daily basis and they may provide you with some additional insights.

I hope these ideas prove helpful in your quest for appropriate lighting for your home.

Good luck.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
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Subject: help!! re: recessed lighting (cans)
Question: Hi - I have to make a decision in just a couple of days about this: we're doing a major remodel. Our lighting plan, designed by an interior designer, calls for cans in the kitchen, which is fine. Our electrician is also pushing cans to light the dining room and living room instead of overheads. He obviously wants to sell his own cans, which are 7 inches. That seems big to me. Also, I've heard black cans are the way to go. Should I insist on smaller cans? (My designer had specified 5 inches for the kitchen - the electrician said no.) Should I insist on black interiors? Should I stick with the plan to use overheads in the dining and living room area? (We're not sure which room will be which.) I sure appreciate a quick answer. He'll start wiring tomorrow. Thanks!!

Answer: This is likely too late to be of value but I hope you can garner something that will help.

Lighting cans have advantages and disadvantages.

Cans are great to create special lighting effects such as "WASHING" a textured wall. They may also be a good choice for specific location utility spot lighting if you are sure that the area needing light will be permanently located in the same position.

There are some serious drawbacks to can lighting.
1) If the lighting design is ever changed, there are many permanent holes to deal with in the ceiling. The ceiling will likely need extensive repairs or replacement.
2) Cans are very inefficient lighting and do not radiate light outward as well as many other fixtures.
3) If cans are not placed very carefully from the beginning, there may be areas that are not lighted equally or adequately.
4) Cans may reduce the efficiency of insulation and HVAC (heating, ventilation, air conditioning) systems.
5) Can lights use very specific bulbs which are more expensive compared to bulbs in many other fixtures.
6) Changing bulbs in cans can be more difficult than many other fixtures.

I am sorry that this is probably not the reply that you were expecting. I just hope that some of this information may prove to be of value.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle - Lamp & Home Outlet
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Subject: installing recessed lighting retrofit kits
Question: I want to replace a dated 6" recessed fixture with a more modern retrofit, but I don't understand how to install it.
I'm looking at this unit: http://www.usalight.com/tb2605b_c_45_p_1_pr_376.html
I know how to "hot wire" a fixture, but I don't know what to do with the fitting that appears to screw into a standard light fixture socket. Do I not remove the old unit? How does that transformer fit in to the housing of the old unit if I leave it. I'm really puzzled by that part with the big bracket that extends at a 90 degree angle to the bracket attached to the transformer. Thanks for your help.

Answer: My first goal is to be of service and I regret that my answer may not be what you expect.

This job should only be performed by a qualified licensed electrician.

The fixture APPEARS to be made for a very specific application which I cannot be certain applies to your situation. Only an experienced licensed electrician can tell for certain after inspecting your outlet box and also the replacement fixture.

I am sorry if my answer is not what you expect but my primary concern is safety.

Kindest Regards
Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Chandlier bulb wattage
Question: Could you please explain what the maximum wattage of bulbs for chandeliers should be. I have just restored 5 olders chandeliers and I am not sure what bulbs to purchase. The chandeliers each have 5 sockets. Only two chandeliers have 75watts marked on the sockets (which I assume means any wattage up to 75 max?) The other three chandeliers have not markings and I don't want to cause overheating by using too high a bulb wattage. I would like to have the maximum amount of light - but do not know how one tells which bulb wattage to use.
I hope you can shed some "light" on my query.
Thanks so much


Answer: This is a question that many of our customers ask but it requires that I have the fixture personally on hand.

I really feel badly that I am unable to answer this question for you. It involves a major safety issue and can only be answered properly and safely upon a personal inspection of the chandelier wiring and socket fixtures.

I apologize for not being able to help you and I hope you understand.

Thanks and Best Regards, Jim Hoyle

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Subject: wiring a timer switch
Question: I want to wire a timer switch but the existing set up is what I believe to be a switch loop setting. There is only one cable running into the box and both the white and black wires are hot.
The timer switch has a red, black, green and white wire.
The confusion for me lies in what do I do with the white wire as I'm pretty sure the black and red wires would connect to the incoming black and white and the green is the ground.
Is it even possible to wire this switch?

Answer: This is an electrical project that has the real potential for serious injury or death. I cannot in good conscience recommend that anyone other than a qualified experienced professional electrician perform this wiring project.

I know this is not the answer you are seeking and I regret that I cannot be of further service to you on this matter.

PLEASE DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS WIRING PROJECT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES.

Kindest - Best Regards - Jim Hoyle

LAMP & SHADE OUTLET http://www.hoylelamps.com/

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Subject: matching light fixtures and faucet fixtures
Question: My faucet fixtures are silver and light fixtures and hardware are gold. I want to replace the light fixture which should I go with the silver or gold.

Answer: This is an especially timely question as silver, nickel and stainless steel colors have become more popular in recent years. Many people find themselves in a similar situation with their hardware and fixtures colors.

The answer to your question is largely a personal one but it also depends on other factors. How close are these two different colors to each other ? How many faucet fixture components are involved ? Which room is this ? Other colors also influence this decision such as counter top color, cabinet color and other color issues which could influence how much the silver and the gold colors stand out as compared to their surroundings.

For instance, my personal kitchen has lots of black granite counter tops. All hardware in the kitchen cabinets are brass but my kitchen faucet is brushed steel which blends in nicely with the gray splotches in the granite and does not conflict at all with the brass hardware in any way. My overhead light fixture is a bronze color Tiffany style.

As Einstein might say, it has a lot to do with relativity. It has even more to do with your personal feelings and tastes.

I hope these ideas have been of some help in your decision.

Good luck !

Thanks and Best Regards, Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Dining Table Lighting Problem
Question: QUESTION: We just remodeled our kitchen and our new chandelier doesn't have a down light feature. We have added recessed cans to wash light down the adjacent walls, but still find our dining table too dim? Would you suggest adding one or more SMALL cans to highlight the table top (or centerpiece)? Any other suggestions? Thanks a bunch!

ANSWER: This sounds like an interesting issue and I hope to be of assistance but first some more information is needed.

If you will reply with your answers, I will try to help.

1) Is the chandelier in the kitchen or a separate dining room ?
2) Size of the area/room where the chandelier and table are being used ?
3) Height of the ceiling where the chandelier and table are being used ?
3) Size of the table and number of chairs ?
4) Size of the chandelier and how many bulbs ?
5) Does the chandelier have fabric or glass shades ?
6) Describe the chandelier ?
7) How far from the table top is the bottom of the chandelier ?

I know this is a lot to answer but lighting is a very significant consideration in the home and each of these variables will help determine your needs.


Thanks and Best Regards, Jim Hoyle



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Wow Jim! Thanks for the quick response. I really appreciate your help. Here goes with the answers to your questions. Let me know if you need more info.

The kitchen/eating area is one long space (14 X 26 feet) with the dining table at one end. Think of an L shaped kitchen with two floating islands going lengthwise (one in the center and one forming the third side of the kitchen). We have 9 foot ceilings in this entire room. There are 3 pendants over the center island.

The dining table is big -- 68" round. We typically have 6 chairs at the table, but can comfortably seat 8. The fixture is just over 30" from the table top.

The chandelier is a three tiered fixture consisting of 3 wrought iron rings with glass shades similar to the shape of a pillar candle pointing up on each ring. I think this is part of the problem because fabric shades would probably direct part of the light downward, while the glass shades just provide a nice glow. The largest ring is on the top -- it is approx. 31" in diameter with 8 bulbs. Middle is approx. 23" with 6 bulbs and the bottom is approx. 14" with 4 bulbs. We have the fixture on a dimmer, but even more wattage doesn't solve the problem as all the light is going up.

I love the fixture and don't want to have to change it, so am hoping you can provide a solution. We are very handy individuals and can easily install a very nice quality, small 3 - 4" halogen lights ourselves. I just don't want to do something that would look cheesy!

Answer: You have already determined two possible remedies.

If adding clip on chandelier shades is an option you would consider, then this should be your first step. Shades with lighter colored linings will better reflect the light.

Chandelier shades accomplish two things. First, they reflect a large portion of the light downward onto the table. You can somewhat simulate this by holding a small lamp shade over one of the bulbs to see how much additional light is reflected onto the table. Multiply this times the number of bulbs in the chandelier to get an idea of the total effect. Second, shading the bulbs will cause the pupils of your eyes to dilate (open) when looking towards the chandelier and this makes the lighting more efficient beneath the chandelier.

If chandelier shades are out of the question, you might consider recessed lighting spaced evenly over and around the table as you mentioned.

A third possible remedy is the use of one or two torchiere floor lamps. These are tall lamps with glass reflectors that bounce light up to and off the ceiling. Torchiere floor lamps function very much like ceiling fixtures except they are portable and they can light up a fairly large area.

I hope these ideas are helpful and that your lighting project works out satisfactorily.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Dining Table Lighting Problem
Question: We just remodeled our kitchen and our new chandelier doesn't have a down light feature. We have added recessed cans to wash light down the adjacent walls, but still find our dining table too dim? Would you suggest adding one or more SMALL cans to highlight the table top (or centerpiece)? Any other suggestions? Thanks a bunch!

Answer: This sounds like an interesting issue and I hope to be of assistance but first some more information is needed.

If you will reply with your answers, I will try to help.

1) Is the chandelier in the kitchen or a separate dining room ?
2) Size of the area/room where the chandelier and table are being used ?
3) Height of the ceiling where the chandelier and table are being used ?
3) Size of the table and number of chairs ?
4) Size of the chandelier and how many bulbs ?
5) Does the chandelier have fabric or glass shades ?
6) Describe the chandelier ?
7) How far from the table top is the bottom of the chandelier ?

I know this is a lot to answer but lighting is a very significant consideration in the home and each of these variables will help determine your needs.


Thanks and Best Regards, Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Basement lighting
Question: What kind of lighting should I put on either side of a 42" flat screen TV that will be recessed into the wall in our basement which is under construction now?
Info: low ceiling 7' to be finished with sheetrock and painted...we need to cast light up to ceiling to give a larger appearance the electrician said...torchier lamps are typically too tall...wall sconces??

Answer: Low profile sconces would be one good choice for this application. There are numerous styles with glass shades of varying colors that do not stick outward more than 6-7". They are designed more for accent light than for general lighting.

Torchiere floor lamps are available in many sizes and heights. Some smaller lamp companies can custom make these to your height specification. The advantage here is a larger variety of wattages that you can use to achieve as little or as much light as needed. Most sconces are limited to 60 watts. Furthermore, floor lamps are portable so you can reposition them as you like or as needed.

I hope these ideas have been of value. In the final analysis, let your own personal feelings and tastes guide you.

Thanks and Best Regards, Jim Hoyle
LAMP & SHADE OUTLET http://www.hoylelamps.com/
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Subject: Vanity Lighting
Question: Sorry to bother you again about lighting my vanity. I plan to heed your advice but have one last question. Your previous response: The best usage is for the fixture glass to be located completely below the top edge of the mirror. This extra reflection from the mirror is like getting free light. You had mentioned a previous problem with shadows and locating the fixture ON the mirror in such a way that the entire wall behind the fixture is mirror should alleviate the shadow problem.

I want to make the mirror the same length as the counter top (67"). Placing the 24" light fixtures on the mirror, centered over each bowl will allow only 1/2" of mirror to the outside of each fixture. Is this okay? Thanks once more.

Answer: No bother, I hope to be of service.

That should not present a problem. The fixture is not mounted to the mirror but is attached to the electrical mounting box behind the fixture and behind the mirror and the box is only about 4" long. The back plate of the fixture rests on the mirror and is supported by the electrical box. As long as this back plate is 1/2" away from the edge of the mirror it should work just fine.

This arrangement gives off the most light from the fixture and the least amount of shadow.

Wishing you brighter days !

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: no hardwiring
Question: Hi Jim!
I live in an apartment with no overhead lighting in living room or bedrooms. I have bought lamps to bring light in, but I feel like I really need that brightness you get from an overhead. I cannot install any hardwired lighting, but really want track lighting. Are there any companies that make track lighting that you can plug into an outlet? Or is there an easy way to modify a hardwired tracklight into a plug in? I don't want anything too expensive as it could become unnecessary if I move, but I really want to brighten up my home.


Answer: Please do not modify a hardwired track light. Modifying any fixture is not recommended and I do not know of any portable ones.

There are two good options to correct your lighting problem.
1) Use a torchiere floor lamp which has an upward pointing glass reflector at the top. I suggest a NON HALOGEN type lamp that will allow you to use either a standard incandescent bulb or better yet the energy efficient compact fluorescent bulb.
2) Use a 6 way floor lamp which has an upward pointing glass reflector at the top as well as 3 arm bulbs for additional lighting. This is the brightest and most versatile lamp that you can find anywhere and you can use the compact fluorescent bulbs in it as well.

Both options will bounce light off the ceiling and around the room very similar to an overhead fixture. The 6 way floor lamp does the best job but it is somewhat more expensive. In either case, stay away from halogen lights due to the extreme heat and high cost of operating.

Good luck and brighter days !
Best Regard - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: QUESTION: My husband and I are building a master bath. We have planned for a 66" double bowl vanity - a 24" bowl unit on each end and a bank of 18" drawers in the middle. We don't have the vanity yet, but my husband is ready to do the wiring. We are hoping to use two mirrors, each centered over the 24" vanity section and side sconces. Problem: What size mirrors would look best? Where should the sconces be placed in relation to the mirrors? Am I trying to get too much into too small a space? Should I be focusing on a single large mirror over the vanity? If so, will a sconce on either side of the vanity provide enough light? I am really struggling with this. We have lights over the vanities in our other 2 baths, and I find that there is always a shadow when trying to apply makeup. I have read that with appropriately placed side sconces, the shadow will be eliminated. Please help.

Thanks, MaryLee

ANSWER: Use at least an 18" wide 3 light down light, non clear glass shade fixture directly over each bowl. Use 1 single mirror running the entire vanity width and reaching up to at least 7.5' high off the floor. Place the sconces so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your master bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Could overhead recessed lighting work instead of the 3 light down light? How close to the mirror should I place the sconces? I appreciate your help on this project.

Thanks,
MaryLee

ANSWER: Overhead recessed lighting may be appropriate for generally illuminating this area but is a poor substitute for the kind of light afforded by a 3 light down light wall fixture over each sink. For maximum light and minimum shadow, the fixture is mounted ON the mirror. The mirror should extend about 6" above where the fixture mounts. The mirror company can simply cut a square hole in the mirror through which the fixture wiring and mounting hardware extends and attaches to the electrical outlet box. This is a common practice in bathroom applications and it provides the maximum light with little to no shadow.

If this is unclear, you are welcome to correspond with me directly.

Good luck on your project.
Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you for your advice. I decided to go with the single large mirror rather than two smaller mirrors. I am considering two 3-light down fixtures (each 26" wide - Hinkley Bolla) for over each bowl. I'm not sure that I want to mount the lights on the mirror, but might prefer to place them just above (considering that the mirror will extend about 80" off the floor). Hope this won't be a big mistake! Now, one last question (I hope), if I mount the lights over the mirror should the lights be completely over the mirror or lap the mirror at the top? Hope this makes sense. I really do appreciate your advice. Thanks again, MaryLee

Answer: The best usage is for the fixture glass to be located completely below the top edge of the mirror. This extra reflection from the mirror is like getting free light. You had mentioned a previous problem with shadows and locating the fixture ON the mirror in such a way that the entire wall behind the fixture is mirror should alleviate the shadow problem.

Good luck.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: QUESTION: My husband and I are building a master bath. We have planned for a 66" double bowl vanity - a 24" bowl unit on each end and a bank of 18" drawers in the middle. We don't have the vanity yet, but my husband is ready to do the wiring. We are hoping to use two mirrors, each centered over the 24" vanity section and side sconces. Problem: What size mirrors would look best? Where should the sconces be placed in relation to the mirrors? Am I trying to get too much into too small a space? Should I be focusing on a single large mirror over the vanity? If so, will a sconce on either side of the vanity provide enough light? I am really struggling with this. We have lights over the vanities in our other 2 baths, and I find that there is always a shadow when trying to apply makeup. I have read that with appropriately placed side sconces, the shadow will be eliminated. Please help.

Thanks, MaryLee

ANSWER: Use at least an 18" wide 3 light down light, non clear glass shade fixture directly over each bowl. Use 1 single mirror running the entire vanity width and reaching up to at least 7.5' high off the floor. Place the sconces so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your master bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Could overhead recessed lighting work instead of the 3 light down light? How close to the mirror should I place the sconces? I appreciate your help on this project.

Thanks,
MaryLee

Answer: Overhead recessed lighting may be appropriate for generally illuminating this area but is a poor substitute for the kind of light afforded by a 3 light down light wall fixture over each sink. For maximum light and minimum shadow, the fixture is mounted ON the mirror. The mirror should extend about 6" above where the fixture mounts. The mirror company can simply cut a square hole in the mirror through which the fixture wiring and mounting hardware extends and attaches to the electrical outlet box. This is a common practice in bathroom applications and it provides the maximum light with little to no shadow.

If this is unclear, you are welcome to correspond with me directly.

Good luck on your project.
Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Bathroom Lighting
Question: My husband and I are building a master bath. We have planned for a 66" double bowl vanity - a 24" bowl unit on each end and a bank of 18" drawers in the middle. We don't have the vanity yet, but my husband is ready to do the wiring. We are hoping to use two mirrors, each centered over the 24" vanity section and side sconces. Problem: What size mirrors would look best? Where should the sconces be placed in relation to the mirrors? Am I trying to get too much into too small a space? Should I be focusing on a single large mirror over the vanity? If so, will a sconce on either side of the vanity provide enough light? I am really struggling with this. We have lights over the vanities in our other 2 baths, and I find that there is always a shadow when trying to apply makeup. I have read that with appropriately placed side sconces, the shadow will be eliminated. Please help.

Thanks, MaryLee

Answer: Use at least an 18" wide 3 light down light, non clear glass shade fixture directly over each bowl. Use 1 single mirror running the entire vanity width and reaching up to at least 7.5' high off the floor. Place the sconces so that the bottom of each glass shade is at least 6.5' off the floor. This arrangement better distributes the light, helps eliminate shadows and generally makes your bathroom a much brighter place to prepare yourself for the day (or for the night).

I hope these ideas have been helpful and that your master bathroom is a happy well lit place for you and your family.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Replacing type of ceiling fixture
Question: Hi Jim - I have a halogen ceiling light fixture and I really like the fixture design/style, but I want to change the light bulb choice over to compact florescent. The wires run from the ceiling through the middle of the fixture in a decorative conduit (about 3 inches long and 1/4" in diameter) into the socket that holds the halogen bulb - the bulb has a small screw type end. I hope this is a sufficient explanation.

Answer: I definitely do not recommend this adaptation due to numerous safety issues. Please do not attempt this under any circumstances.

I certainly understand you wanting to switch over to compact fluorescent (CFL )due to the extreme electrical power savings as well as the huge reduction in heat, but you really should concentrate your efforts on locating another fixture that is already configured for a compact fluorescent bulb.

I suggest that you look for a fixture that accepts a standard Edison base bulb which is commonly found in most portable table lamps. There are a wide variety of CFL bulbs available with the standard Edison base and there will be many more to come. Many states have already passed legislation to encourage (force) the use of CFL and other energy efficient bulbs and other states are following.

I hope this answer has been helpful.

Please accept my personal thanks and encouragement for doing your part to help keep our planet clean and green.

Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Light Fixtures
Question: What determines how far a hanging light is hung from a ceiling, when it as adjustable with a chain type fixture?

Answer: It depends on where you hang it among other things. Over a home dining table - the bottom should generally be around 36" from the table top. But out in the middle of the room you want to allow at least 7' off the floor. A lot depends on the size of the room, the height of the ceiling, where it is used in the room, the size of the fixture.

If you would like to send me all the specifics listed above, I can better help you.

Please reply to my email or visit our website and I will respond personally.

Best Regards - jim Hoyle
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Subject: antique lamp
Question: I purchased this lamp at a flea market because i like the unique design. It a foor lamp except it has curve about halfway down to fit up with a table so the lights are over hetable. It was really dirty and rusty. I have stopped the rust and cleaned up. I would like to restore it as close to it's original look as possible. So i need to identify it's maker and how it looked.

Answer: I will be more than happy to offer some information about the lamp but a good photo and measurements are required.

You are welcome to correspond with me directly through my lamp website and I will respond as soon as I hear from you.

Best Regards
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: lighting
Question: would a balance light be good for my son while he is in college doing architecture work

Answer: I would be happy to answer this question better but I need some further description of "balance light". There are many such terms used rather loosely in sales and marketing so I want to make certain of what you are asking.

Generally work projects and utility type lighting require a desk or floor lamp which directs light intensely onto the desk or work area. The type of light (incandescent, fluorescent, halogen) is largely a personal matter.

Please note that there are many lamps currently on the market which are extremely problematic and expensive when you try to replace the burned out bulb. Before buying a lamp you should personally verify exactly where you can find a bulb and exactly how much it will cost. These problematic lamps are WIDELY SOLD IN MANY STORES. We run into this problem at least once a week where a customer will bring in a specialty type lamp for repair and it is simply the bulb burned out and not available anywhere or if available it may cost as much as $ 29 + shipping.
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Subject: recessed lighting housing and trim mix n match
Question: Hi there. We have Elko cans installed and now looking at trims for them. A friend mentioned that he knows some people who put Juno trims on Elko cans (The trims look better to some people.) A lighting store person said you cannot do this. So questions are:
1) Can you mix trims and housing in this case?
2) Would it somehow jeopardize the electrical inspection?

Thanks for assistance.

(I have been searching blogs, groups,professional forums, etc. and cannot find info on it, so I assume mst people stick with same brand housing as can.)


Answer: Altering a lighting fixture requires a licensed professional and even then it is likely not a good idea. I agree with the lighting store person who said that you could not do this. Please do not alter the fixture.

Best Regards
Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Light Fixture Rating
Question: I have recessed lighting in my home in which the fixture rating is MAX 75W. Can I use a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) rated at 23W for a 120W replacement?

Answer: The wattage rating on light bulbs is actually a measurement of the amount of energy (electricity) that the bulb uses. Yes, you can substitute a 23 watt compact fluorescent (CFL) for a 75 watt incandescent. Just be certain that the fluorescent bulb fits properly with adequate clearances. This is a great idea that benefits our environment as well as your purse. Many states are already passing laws to encourage the use of compact fluorescent bulbs.

Another innovation which is still being developed is the expanded use of LED bulbs for residential lighting. LED (light emitting diode) bulbs not only drastically further cut energy costs but greatly reduce heat output with an extremely long life span. This is a giant leap forward in lighting technology. It is actually available in a limited offering of bulb configurations but at very expensive prices. Expect to see more LED bulbs for the home in the new future.

Thanks for considering CFL bulbs for your home. It benefits us all.

Best Regards, Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: chandelier
Question: How long of a drop should I have from the ceiling to over my table with my chandelier

Answer: Some additional information that would help me answer your question:
Is this a dining room or another room ?
Ceiling height
Table size
Number of chairs
Room dimensions

Thanks and Best Regards - Jim Hoyle
www.hoylelamps.com
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Subject: Vintage lamps/vintage lighting fixture
Question: Hi, Jim, I was so glad to find you on Allexperts! I have two lamps that my husband brought home from the dump that I think could have more than "flea market" value. There are no apparent markings on them. They appear to be solid brass, approximately 26" high (not including light fixture); it weighs approx. 10#, it's approx. 23" in diameter at the base. The lamp is divided into three "globe-type" designs, the middle one has handles. Each "globe" is etched with an Asian-type design and also has a relief design. The lamp has three "cabriolet" legs which sit on an open base.
I know it's hard to make a determination without a photo, so if you have a website I can send the photo to, please let me know.
I also have a vintage round glass light fixture that my husband and I are stumped as to how to hang it. It is 12 1/2" across, looks like a "UFO" ship, and has three holes on the sides. We have tried rings, chains, different base lighting, but cannot seem to get how to hang it correctly. What should the base lighting be? How do we hang the fixture from the three holes and where do we attach the chains? What kind of rings should we use? How far should the fixture be from the light bulb? If you had a picture of a vintage fixture that is already hung, perhaps that would help us.
I thank you beforehand for your help with these two lighting dilemmas!
Elizabeth Tilford

Answer: Both sound very interesting. The lamp actually sounds very familiar to me.

I should be able to help with both issues but unfortunately both require photos.

You can check out my website and contact me from any page: www.hoylelamps.com-------
Subject: Positioning of light fixture over dining table
Question: For the first time I have a dining room, so I've had no experience positioning a lighting fixture over the dining table. My question regards how high to position the fixture. It is a lovely long type 3 bulb fixture which will fit well over our longish rectangular table. This table will be used a lot for eating, sitting around visiting (this is an open plan farmhouse kitchen), and game playing. On a farm this room ends up being the heart and soul of the house. Thanks for your help.

Answer: Great question ! We often get this inquiry from customers visiting our showroom. The average table is 30" tall and the best vertical location for a hanging residential dining room fixture is so the bottom of the fixture is around 32 - 36" from the table top. This position places the fixture well above everyone when seated but yet close enough so the table is well lit for eating, playing games or just relaxing.

Enjoy your new fixture !
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Subject: Lighting Colors
Question: I am an event planner and wanting to incorporate more lighting affects into my indoor events. One thing I have seen done is to use different colors. I am wondering if there are special lights you can buy or filters that create different colors. And not just standard, red, yellow, blue, green. I want to customize the colors a little more than that. These would be lights that would be placed on the floor around a large room and shooting upward--something I can plug in, too, since it's not a permanent fixture.

Answer: You might try one of the novelty stores that are common in many shopping malls. Also try party stores. In some cities there are specialty light bulb stores. Do a Google search in Charlotte and Gastonia North Carolina and you are likely to find one of these stores.

Good luck - Jim

- Jim Hoyle

Biography: Since 1979 Jim Hoyle has owned and operated Lamp Shades & Lamps Outlet  http://www.hoylelamps.com/  North Carolina's Most Exclusive Unique Lamps and Lamp Shades. Jim designs and manufactures fine cast metal table lamps and floor lamps and collects, buys, sells, repairs, rewires, restores, refinishes and appraises antique lamps from special acquisitions and estates worldwide. His company also specializes in lamp and home decor factory buyouts and warehouse closings. Comments and questions are answered personally. The company website contains a wealth of free information about antique lamps, shades and lighting.

Visit his lamp shop and store at 2233 East Main Street, Lincolnton, North Carolina about 25 minutes from Charlotte.

We do everything for lamps, shades and chandeliers - buy, sell, repair, restore, rewire, refinish, lamp appraisals.